"And how should I presume?"

The unsophisticated ramblings of an unenlightened twenty-something who hopes to, one day, change the world.


Cast of characters:

The Anna to my Elsa (and tag)
The Michael to my Wendy Darling (and tag)
The Wash to my Zoe (and tag)
The John to my Sherlock
The Keladry to my Alanna
The Mal to my Zoe


This Journal Is QUILTBAG Positive

This Journal Is Sex Work Positive

This Journal Is Body Positive

This Journal Is Positive

Posts I Like
Folks I Follow
Posts tagged "homosexual"

elizabeth-jo:

I have a final exam on Monday in my Gay and Lesbian Studies class and we can talk about ANYTHING! Awesome right? Well I want to talk about how young people apart of the LGBT community are coming out on Tumblr. I want to know why some of you chose to come out on tumblr. Did it make you stronger to come out to your family and friends? Do you have more support from people on Tumblr? And are you out outside of social media and why not?

I understand that I am asking some personal questions. I get asked a lot of questions all the time, so I understand. If you don’t feel comfortable with me knowing who you are, sending a message anon is perfectly fine! ^_^ I just really want other peoples advice, stories, and comments. I love to listen =)

Thank you for sharing and please reblog…. I need an A on this final lol

I want to know why some of you chose to come out on tumblr.

The Internet is the only place where I can be myself entirely, and my bisexuality is a huge part of that. I’ve found the Internet in general to be a very accepting place, and even if someone is a douche, I can respond with a well-formed argument instead of just flipping shit, because I express myself better online. I honestly don’t care if someone knows BB is bisexual, because this Tumblr isn’t connected back to me very much.

Did it make you stronger to come out to your family and friends?

No, but then, I was already out by the time I got on Tumblr. 

Do you have more support from people on Tumblr?

Than in real life? Definitely.

And are you out outside of social media and why not?

I am to most people. I don’t tell people I’ve just met or don’t know very well because I don’t know how they’ll bounce. I’m out but I’m not stupid.

It must be awful, being a homophobe. Having to spend all that time obsessing about what gay people might be doing with their genitals. Seeing it in your mind, over and over again, in high-definition close-up. Bravely you masturbate, to make the pictures go away, but to no avail. They’re seared onto your mental membranes. Every time you close your eyes, an imaginary gay man’s imaginary penis rises from the murk, bowing ominously in your direction, sensing your discomfort. Laughing. Mocking. Possibly even winking. How dare they, this man and his penis? How dare they do this to you?


Obviously you can’t fight the big gay penis in your head. It has no physical form, so you can’t get a grip on it, much as you’d like to. You’d love to grab it and throttle it until it splutters its last. That might bring you closure. But no. So you do the next best thing. You condemn homosexuals in the real world. Maybe if they could just stop all this “being gay” business for 10 minutes, you’d get some respite from that scary headcock. It might shrivel away completely, leaving nothing behind. Except maybe a nice bit of bum.

inothernews:

So why do I take my Church to task?

Because everyone says that the Church’s leadership doesn’t represent the true beliefs and attitudes of their flock — but then that faithful flock says exactly jack shit when their cardinals, archbishops and the like make outrageous proclamations like this.

And when they do shit like this.

I needn’t continue, since at this point Jesus Himself is doing a fucking facepalm.  But get your shit straight, Catholic Church.

I’ve been forced to explain homosexuality to my kids (aged 3 and 4) because their uncle is gay. This incredibly difficult and traumatic experience went as follows:

Child: Why does Uncle Bob go everywhere with Pete?
Me: Because they’re in love, just like Mummy and Daddy are.
Child: Oh. Can I have a biscuit?

We’re all scarred for life. Scarred, I tell you.

KateP, Internet commenter (via cocklordsimone)

(via blibberinghumdinger)

thatchipperchick:

posted this on fb.

interesting, to say the least. im not one for labels, but at least this explains some of them:

http://www.yaygender.net/pages/gender.pl

This is brilliant!

metaphoricheart:

How are we supposed to get the rest of the world to stop hating us if we can’t stop hating each other?

Just a thought.

I went to a workshop about being an ally for QUILTBAG++ people, and most of it I already knew (except that “transgendered” isn’t a word). I’m just excited because I get to have a rainbow flag on my dorm room door, and it was awesome to meet actual Allies instead of just other LGBTQ+ people. 

gaypolitics:

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth and those questioning their sexuality are at greater risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, bullying by their peers and truancy, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.

The study, published in the October issue of the journalEducational Researcher, also revealed some striking differences among the various groups of sexual minority youth.

The study, based upon anonymous online surveys of more than 13,000 middle and high school students in Dane County, Wis., included a set of eight questions with low-probability responses that were used to screen out mischievous responders, according to researchers.

Drs. Joseph Robinson and Dorothy Espelage, both educational psychologists, found that while the majority of LGBTQ students reported not being at risk of suicide, being bullied or skipping school, they were at greater risk than straight youth.

A little more than 7 percent of straight youth reported thinking about suicide during the prior 30 days, versus 33 percent of LGBTQ students. Bisexual youth were at especially high risk (44 percent), as were questioning youth (32 percent). Bisexual youth also were at elevated risk of suicide attempts, with more than 21 percent reporting that they had made at least one attempt during the prior year.

Nearly twice as many LGBTQ students as straight students — 39 percent vs. 20 percent — reported having been bullied, threatened or harassed over the Internet. Again, bisexual youth reported the highest levels of victimization — 49 percent — among sexual minority youth.

LGBTQ students reported a much lower senses of school “belongingness” — the feeling that they belonged at their school, that there were adults they could talk to when they had problems and that graduating was important — than straight youth, particularly during middle school, the study indicated.

About 22 percent of LGBTQ students reported skipping school during middle school, a rate that remained consistent through high school, far exceeding that of straight youth, who reported unexcused absence rates of 7 percent during middle school and 14 percent during high school.

“For some of the outcomes, such as unexcused absences, we found that LGBTQ were already at a heightened risk level by middle school,” Robinson said. “We interpret that as a sign that we may need to intervene earlier for LGBTQ students. We can’t look at what straight kids are doing and assume that LGBTQ kids are at the same risk.

“The fact that we see these large differences in risk patterns for LGBTQ students in middle school is cause for concern and points to the need for more research to understand why they have disproportionately poorer educational and psychological outcomes.”

Including discussions about sexual orientation and sexual identity in bullying prevention programs could contribute to safer school environments and better outcomes for LGBTQ students, the researchers wrote.

Source: University of Illinois 

[via PsychCentral.]

(via )

happilyevernow:

beautifulwhatsyourhurry:

postpotterdepressionlife:

originalscreenname:

permanentlyjetlagged:

lookawayfromwhatyoudid:

drugsandrainbows:

67chevyimpala:

6277:

theshelteredlife:

colorofsakura:

gaymersnoopy:

THIS. THIS. THIS. BEST VALID RANT ON GAY MARRIAGE AND EQUALITY EVER (In my opinion…so far.).

Stop what you are doing, and watch this right now.

YES!

This is probably one of the best things I have ever heard.

oh wow

This is most definitely the best thing I’ve ever heard.

i’m having a proud mother moment over someone i didn’t know even existed 10 minutes ago

BECAUSE IT LOOKS LIKE ADAM AND EVE FUCKED UP BIG TIME

“Because at least cock-sucking you can prove.”

"These are people who will raise a child for a better reason than ‘the condom broke.’"

It’s like a cross between a slam poem and stand-up comedy and my word, sir, you are fucking fantastic.

(via tall-ish)

No, lesbian, gay, and bisexual orientations are not disorders. Research has found no inherent association between any of these sexual orientations and psychopathology. Both heterosexual behavior and homosexual behavior are normal aspects of human sexuality. Both have been documented in many different cultures and historical eras. Despite the persistence of stereotypes that portray lesbian, gay, and bisexual people as disturbed, several decades of research and clinical experience have led all mainstream medical and mental health organizations in this country to conclude that these orientations represent normal forms of human experience. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual relationships are normal forms of human bonding. Therefore, these mainstream organizations long ago abandoned classifications of homosexuality as a mental disorder.

American Psychological Association

Dear Michele Bachmann, would you like me to illustrate why you are wrong?

(via theowlintheolivetree)

(via theowlintheolivetree-deactivate)

gaypolitics:

Recent statements of Rick Perry, Governor of Texas and presidential candidate, emphasize the anti-gay elements that have permeated this GOP primary season. Perry’s views are largely out-of-step with those of mainstream Americans – including people of faith.

HRC has been…

(via mrlucidq)

theowlintheolivetree:

shootoutallthelights:

parparazzi:

Like how most of them watch lesbian porn and jack off to it then they turn around and say they’re against same sex marriage

Hypocrites!

(via theowlintheolivetree-deactivate)

i-think-books-are-a-thrill:

dinkydiddydums:

getstooobsessed:

“Mommy, they are just like me.” 

My oldest son is six years old and in love for the first time.  He is in love with Blaine from Glee. 

For those who don’t know Blaine is a boy…a gay boy, the boyfriend of one of the main characters, Kurt.

This isn’t a ‘he thinks Blaine is really cool’ kind of love.  It is a mooning at a picture of Blaine’s face for a half hour followed by a wistful “He’s so pretty” kind of love.

He loves the episode where two boys kiss.  My son will call people in from other parts of the house to make sure they don’t miss his ‘favorite part.’  He’s been known to rewind it and watch it over again…and force other to, as well, if he doesn’t think people have been paying enough attention.

This infatuation doesn’t bother me or his father.  We live in a very hip-liberal neighborhood, many of our friends are gay, and idea of having a gay son isn’t something that bothers either of us.  Our son is going to be who he is, and it is our job to love him.  End of story.

He is also six.  Six year olds get obsessed with all kinds of things.  This might not mean anything at all.  We always joke that he’s either gay, or we have the best blackmail material in the history of mankind when he’s a 16 year old straight boy. (Take that naked bath time pictures!)

Then the other day we were traveling across the state listening to the Warblers album (of course), and in the middle of Candles, my son pipes up from the back seat.

“Mommy, Kurt and Blaine are boyfriends.”

“Yes, they are,” I affirm.

“They don’t like kissing girls.  They just kiss boys.”

“That’s true.”

“Mommy, they are just like me.”

“That’s great, baby.  You know I love you no matter what?”

“I know…” I could hear him rolling his eyes at me.

When we got home I recapped this conversation to his Dad, and we stood simply looking into each other’s eyes for a moment.  Then we smiled.

“So if at 16 he wants to make a big announcement at the dinner table, we can say ‘You told us when you were six.  Pass the carrots’ and he’ll be disappointed we stole his big dramatic moment,” my husband says with a laugh and hugs me.

Only time will tell if my son is gay, but if he is I am glad he’s mine.  I am glad he has been born into our family.  A family full of people who will love and accept him.  People who will never want him to change.  With parents who will look forward to dancing at his wedding.

And I have to admit, Blaine would be a really cute son-in-law.

sdfghksfhsklrjhngsf that’s so cute omg

Parenting: you are doing it so damn right!

(via violet-saturn-deactivated201305)

I made this graphic for everyone in the LGBTQ community, because sometimes there’s a lot of infighting and hatred within as well as without.

I made this graphic for everyone in the LGBTQ community, because sometimes there’s a lot of infighting and hatred within as well as without.